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Joe G
02-22-2017, 01:18 AM
289 C-code engine. 2bbl intake/carb removed and replaced with Edelbrock 4bbl carb/intake around 2005? Auto trans.

Last driven in 2008. Parked when the fuel pump went out. Replaced that then the carb started leaking (think the float stuck). Job at that time had me on the road Mon-Fri so it was never fixed. Been sitting ever since.

If someone were to get this up and running again, what would you do/have done since it hasn't been started in almost 9 years.

What I've come up with:
- drain old gas in tank/fuel lines. Should I just replace tank and put in new lines? Assume they're pretty gummed up/full of crud.
- remove carb, clean and replace seals
- drain oil, coolant, etc.
- what about transmission - anything I need to do there?
- mechanic said might be good to remove oil pan and valve covers to make sure nothing is "sludge" that could cause damage when re-starting. Good?


What else?

Tommy Gun
02-22-2017, 01:28 AM
:faint:

Tommy Gun
02-22-2017, 01:36 AM
Check belts and hoses.

Guess tank would be gummed up and fresh fuel would just break some of that loose and possibly clog stuff up. If tank is cheap, replace. If not, they make coatings to restore the inside.

Fuel lines would be a pain to replace I think. Definitely fuel filter. Probably fuel pump since diaphragm could be dried up and leak.

Trans fluid change.

Tires :faint:

68fastback
02-22-2017, 02:05 AM
Those things all sound worthwhile ...fuel lines might be okay but why not replace; tank probably has moisture tho may be fine otherwise if you just clean it, but if you're going to take it down to clean it, might as well replace it unless it looks shiny (no corrosion) inside on the bottom.

Joe, after you do those things and are ready to fire it up, pre-pressurize the oil system -- very worthwhile: disconnect the high-voltage wire to the center of distrib, unbolt the fuel pump from the block (probably only 2 bolts) an just pull it back so it doesn't pump and pull the spark plugs (you'll probably be changing them anyway). If you do that you can then crank the engine for up to 30 seconds without melting the starter. Watch to see if oil pressure gauge moves (if no gauge, it's worth plumbing one in). Once you see it move (should only take about 10 sec.) crank for the remainder up to 30 seconds total (so as not to damage starter) to well-lube everything, especially cam. If oil pressure gauge isn't moving there's a pick-up issue (most likely a screen clog). If you didn't pull the plugs before cranking you'll have to limit crank time to 15 seconds to not overheat the starter (and wait 10 minutes before re-cranking) ...much better with the plugs pulled since it will also crank much faster and actually lube things better. Once you see pressure for a bit, you can re-bolt up the pump, install the new plugs, put the HV wire back in the distrib and it should fire right up ...as soon as fuel gets to the carb.

Might want to replace the points too -- you can just file them clean and re-gap but the anti-arc capacitor should be replaced (usually one comes with a new set of points) since they tend to electrically leak after 10 years or so ...it's there to prevent the points from arcing over and failing. Better yet, pick up a capacitive-discharge ignition -- the points then won't carry any current -- just used as a trigger for the electronics -- and will last until the rubbing block wears down (be sure to lube the distributor cam!) ...will last about 5x longer than points usually last with a CD ignition.

Since there's no alloy in the engine you can use any standard coolant ...no need for the pricey chemistry ;-)

I think the trans should be fine for the purpose of trying things out ...If all goes well you might want to change the fluid ...maybe even pull the pan and check the screen for corrosion and replace the rubber 'hat' fittings ...they tend to dry-out and crack over time, but the trans itself should be fine. If it shifts ok and downshifts, no worries. If not then pull the pan and check screen and rubbers. That's probably a C3 (vs C6) so not so familiar with it but probably similar considerations.

Also you'll want to check the brakes ...buy some fancy beer and invite Dave over :giggle:

68fastback
02-22-2017, 02:15 AM
Check belts and hoses.

Guess tank would be gummed up and fresh fuel would just break some of that loose and possibly clog stuff up. If tank is cheap, replace. If not, they make coatings to restore the inside.

Fuel lines would be a pain to replace I think. Definitely fuel filter. Probably fuel pump since diaphragm could be dried up and leak.

Trans fluid change.

Tires :faint:

Good thinking on the fuel filter and tires!

I think the 289 fuel pumps used metal diaphram pump -- usually fail from stress cracks vs drying.

---

It's funny how many things can need attention -- or not!
A buddy in CT had a early 50s Ford flatbed truck sitting on his property ...not fired since at least the mid 70s. He pulled the tank and it was fugly inside -- like black honey! -- so he had to deal with that. Filed the points and for laughs hooked up a battery ...it cranked for about 5 seconds and fired up :haha: ...heck all 6 cylinders were firing after about a minute :rofl3: Amazing! Of course the brakes were frozen and the clutch throw-out bearing screamed like a banshee ...for a while. But it ran!

onecrazydog
02-22-2017, 02:30 AM
289 C-code engine. 2bbl intake/carb removed and replaced with Edelbrock 4bbl carb/intake around 2005? Auto trans.

Last driven in 2008. Parked when the fuel pump went out. Replaced that then the carb started leaking (think the float stuck). Job at that time had me on the road Mon-Fri so it was never fixed. Been sitting ever since.

If someone were to get this up and running again, what would you do/have done since it hasn't been started in almost 9 years.

What I've come up with:
- drain old gas in tank/fuel lines. Should I just replace tank and put in new lines? Assume they're pretty gummed up/full of crud.
- remove carb, clean and replace seals
- drain oil, coolant, etc.
- what about transmission - anything I need to do there?
- mechanic said might be good to remove oil pan and valve covers to make sure nothing is "sludge" that could cause damage when re-starting. Good?


What else?


Remove tank and check the inside, it might be ok... Steel lines should be good, check the rubber hoses...

Rebuild carb...

Change all fluids, motor, trans, including rear diff... Trans filter wouldn't hurt...

Replace valve cover gaskets, trans pan gasket, rear diff...

If you can get the oil pan off easy, pull it... If not, drain the oil, leave plug out and pour a couple of quarts of cheap oil thru it... Then stick a long q tip in the plug hole and check for sludge...

Replace plugs, check wires for cracks, replace them if you can... Check points if it has them... Check and clean distributor cap, may have some corrosion on the contacts...

Check brake lines for cracks or leaks...

Fresh gas, fire it up...

And what I missed and Dan said!!

The Bone
02-23-2017, 01:38 PM
Since you have the plugs out give a squirt of oil in each cylinder before you crank it over.
To drain the fuel their may be a drain plug. Mine has one but if you dont want to remove the drain plug just remove the fuel hose from the tank and it will drain out of there just fine. Don't drive it without doing the brakes. Remove all the hoses and replace them. Remove all the fluid. Replace the master cylinder because its probably junk. Anything made with rubber will be junk. Heat and time is a enemy of rubber. Before you drive it do a good inspection to see if everything is not leaking before you hit the road.

Carnut
02-23-2017, 05:42 PM
Check for hydro lock, pull the plugs and spin it over a few times to make sure no coolant has leaked into the cylinders. I would do it by hand using a ratchet and the bolt on the front of the dampener. Then you are clear to do all of the other things you want. The oil in the cylinders is a good idea, it will smoke when it starts, change the oil with the engine warmed up. I would also replace those fuel hoses before I even tried starting it. Everything else in previous posts are valid.

Tommy Gun
02-24-2017, 01:41 AM
Those things all sound worthwhile ...fuel lines might be okay but why not replace; tank probably has moisture tho may be fine otherwise if you just clean it, but if you're going to take it down to clean it, might as well replace it unless it looks shiny (no corrosion) inside on the bottom.

Joe, after you do those things and are ready to fire it up, pre-pressurize the oil system -- very worthwhile: disconnect the high-voltage wire to the center of distrib, unbolt the fuel pump from the block (probably only 2 bolts) an just pull it back so it doesn't pump and pull the spark plugs (you'll probably be changing them anyway). If you do that you can then crank the engine for up to 30 seconds without melting the starter. Watch to see if oil pressure gauge moves (if no gauge, it's worth plumbing one in). Once you see it move (should only take about 10 sec.) crank for the remainder up to 30 seconds total (so as not to damage starter) to well-lube everything, especially cam. If oil pressure gauge isn't moving there's a pick-up issue (most likely a screen clog). If you didn't pull the plugs before cranking you'll have to limit crank time to 15 seconds to not overheat the starter (and wait 10 minutes before re-cranking) ...much better with the plugs pulled since it will also crank much faster and actually lube things better. Once you see pressure for a bit, you can re-bolt up the pump, install the new plugs, put the HV wire back in the distrib and it should fire right up ...as soon as fuel gets to the carb.

Might want to replace the points too -- you can just file them clean and re-gap but the anti-arc capacitor should be replaced (usually one comes with a new set of points) since they tend to electrically leak after 10 years or so ...it's there to prevent the points from arcing over and failing. Better yet, pick up a capacitive-discharge ignition -- the points then won't carry any current -- just used as a trigger for the electronics -- and will last until the rubbing block wears down (be sure to lube the distributor cam!) ...will last about 5x longer than points usually last with a CD ignition.

Since there's no alloy in the engine you can use any standard coolant ...no need for the pricey chemistry ;-)

I think the trans should be fine for the purpose of trying things out ...If all goes well you might want to change the fluid ...maybe even pull the pan and check the screen for corrosion and replace the rubber 'hat' fittings ...they tend to dry-out and crack over time, but the trans itself should be fine. If it shifts ok and downshifts, no worries. If not then pull the pan and check screen and rubbers. That's probably a C3 (vs C6) so not so familiar with it but probably similar considerations.

Also you'll want to check the brakes ...buy some fancy beer and invite Dave over :giggle:



This is much easier than all that.... https://www.amazon.com/OEMTOOLS-27061-Ford-Inch-Primer/dp/B0049OCMNQ/ref=pd_lpo_263_bs_t_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=V5PCV14FFDBX3YHZMJT0

Carnut
02-24-2017, 02:37 AM
This is much easier than all that.... https://www.amazon.com/OEMTOOLS-27061-Ford-Inch-Primer/dp/B0049OCMNQ/ref=pd_lpo_263_bs_t_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=V5PCV14FFDBX3YHZMJT0

Good tool.

68fastback
02-24-2017, 02:42 AM
Yeah ...nice tool ...drive the pump directly ...have to pull the dist and then reset timing.

Carnut
02-24-2017, 02:43 AM
If you mark the distributor before you pull it, its an easy peasy back in.

68fastback
02-24-2017, 03:22 AM
yup, just line up the marks ...just have to make sure it properly engages the pump before tightening the hold-down ...knew someone who forgot to do that. :yikes:

onecrazydog
02-24-2017, 06:08 PM
Is this all done yet??

twobjshelbys
02-24-2017, 07:54 PM
Check for hydro lock, pull the plugs and spin it over a few times to make sure no coolant has leaked into the cylinders. I would do it by hand using a ratchet and the bolt on the front of the dampener. Then you are clear to do all of the other things you want. The oil in the cylinders is a good idea, it will smoke when it starts, change the oil with the engine warmed up. I would also replace those fuel hoses before I even tried starting it. Everything else in previous posts are valid.



Definitely warm up the engine, but not just idle standing still but by driving it, before changing the oil. The pan is probably full of sludge and needs more than just oil pump action to clean it out. In fact I'd change it right after cranking it up and then again in about 500 miles.

Alot of the stuff like replacing gas tank and fuel lines is overkill. Get some fuel injector cleaner - it has a solvent that will aid in breaking down the gum in the rest of the system. Draining the tank is a good idea but there isn't enough left in the lines to matter (except for the shellac left behind). On the other hand, gas that old is still better than gas we have today.

All fluids should be changed out. If it drips, change it. That includes transmission and clutch/brakes. But don't do oil and coolant until you've driven it a little - the goal is to get all the stuff into suspension so change them while they are hot.

Joe G
02-24-2017, 10:11 PM
Is this all done yet??

:umno:

The Bone
02-25-2017, 12:59 PM
Joe moves like molasses on a cold day :rofl:

Tommy Gun
02-25-2017, 10:06 PM
If you mark the distributor before you pull it, its an easy peasy back in.



Fought that a few times, but much easier!

Tommy Gun
02-25-2017, 10:08 PM
Joe moves like molasses on a cold day :rofl:


:goodpost:



But also amazed he still remembers he had another car. :faint:

.

Joe G
03-01-2017, 01:39 AM
Joe moves like molasses on a cold day :rofl:

I'm waiting for you to stop by. Need someone who knows what they're doing!!

Joe G
03-01-2017, 01:39 AM
:goodpost:



But also amazed he still remembers he had another car. :faint:

.

I remember. Just can't do it alone. :kickrock:

Highwayman
03-02-2017, 03:01 AM
I remember. Just can't do it alone. :kickrock:

Dave's too busy now playing catch up